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Tag Archives: Nonfiction

Kayelle Allen is a best selling American author. Her unstoppable
heroes and heroines include contemporary every day folk, role-playing immortal gamers,
futuristic covert agents, and warriors who purr.

About An Immortal’s Guide to Tarth

An Immortal's Guide to Tarth - books to read
An Immortal’s Guide to Tarth. 
Title An Immortal’s Guide to Tarth
Genre Fiction, Non-fiction, Gaming, Scifi
Author Kayelle Allen
Book heat level (based on movie ratings): PG

An Immortal’s Guide to Tarth is a tongue-in-cheek look at what
relocating to the Tarthian Empire would be like for the immortals in books by
Kayelle Allen. A bit of fiction, written in a non-fiction way, the book offers
guidance from Joss Avaton, one of the immortals. Provides dire warnings about
who not to cross, and what to do about pesky Mundanes (namely, those annoying
humans), and who among the Chosen is not to be trusted.
The role playing game of Peril is spelled out, with
downloads for character sheets and rules. Includes a who’s who among the
immortals, and stats of the players, with never before revealed secrets about
Luc Saint-Cyr, Pietas, and others.
A must have for fans of the series. This handy guide will
inform, entertain, and provide peeks behind the curtain.

Buy the Book

Publisher Romance Lives Forever Books

About The Tarthian Empire Companion

Tarthian Empire Companion, books to read
Tarthian Empire Companion 
Title Tarthian Empire Companion, an illustrated
World-Building Bible and Guide to Writing a Science Fiction Series. Original
art by Jamin Allen and Kayelle Allen.
Genre: Fiction, Non-fiction, Gaming, Scifi
Author Kayelle Allen
Book heat level (based on movie ratings): PG

For the science fiction writer, this volume teaches you how to
build believable worlds, track details of your story, organize your writing, and
lay out your story bible. Novice or experienced, you will pick up tricks and tips
here. Includes organizational tips, links to
marketing sites, groups supporting writers, science fiction groups and more. For the science fiction fan, the Companion reveals the worldbuilding
magic that makes Kayelle Allen’s Tarthian Empire tick. She shares every character
in every book, 10k years of future history, offers inside peeks at scenes and stories,
lays out a quick tour of the Empire, and dishes up a surfeit of secrets, all in
one illustrated volume.

Original art by Jamin Allen and Kayelle Allen.

Buy the Book

Publisher Romance Lives Forever Books

About the Illustrator

The illustrator for the Tarthian Empire Companion is Jamin Allen,
the founder of Nimajination Studios, who is known as “Volgraza” on the
popular YouTube channel V^2Gamers. He is married and has two sons. His professional training
as an illustrator began at the Art Institute of Atlanta, but he knew he wanted to
be an artist from the time he was five. His latest project is designing a game for a web series he is creating.

Author Social Media

Homeworld/Blog https://kayelleallen.com

Tarthian Empire Companion 
Cover Love includes a cover, blurb, buy links, and social media
contacts for the author. Today’s featured book is Tarthian Empire Companion, an
illustrated World-Building Bible and Guide to Writing a Science Fiction Series by
Kayelle Allen.

About the Book

Title Tarthian Empire Companion, an illustrated World-Building
Bible and Guide to Writing a Science Fiction Series
Genre Scifi / Non-fiction
Author Kayelle Allen
Book heat level (based on movie ratings): G
Created for both the reader and the writer, the Tarthian Empire Companion reveals the worldbuilding magic that makes Kayelle Allen’s Tarthian Empire tick. This EPIC eBook Award winning writer shares 10k years of future history, offers peeks at scene and character creation, lays out a quick tour of the Empire, and dishes up a surfeit of secrets for fans, all in one illustrated volume.
For the writer of science fiction, and the writer who wants to create a science fiction series, this volume teaches you how to build believable worlds, track details of your story, organize your writing, and lay out your story bible. Novice or experienced, you will pick up tricks and tips here.  Provides organizational tips, links to marketing sites, groups supporting writers, science fiction groups, and more. Material from the author’s 90+ page website is included. Original art by Jamin Allen and Kayelle Allen.

Buy This Book

Publisher Romance Lives Forever Books
Find this book on Goodreads http://bit.ly/1DtIrOR
Coming soon in print

About the Author

Science Fiction and Fantasy author Kayelle Allen is the winner
of the 2010 EPIC award for Science Fiction, and the 2008 Honorable Mention for Science
Fiction Fantasy. Her unstoppable heroes and heroines include contemporary every
day folk, role-playing immortal gamers, futuristic covert agents, and warriors who
purr.

Author Social Media

Website (mobile) http://kayelleallen.mobi
Website (full) http://kayelleallen.com
Genre: nonfiction, creative writing craft
Author Name Suz deMello
Book heat level (based on movie ratings): G
Both of Suz deMello’s acclaimed writing manuals, now in one handy
volume. Useful for any writer from aspiring to advanced…plotting, characterization
and conflict, point of view, scene and sequel and more! Now available in large print.
About Writing: Your Essential Writing Guide by Suz deMello Both
of Suz deMello’s famed writing manuals, now in one handy paperback. A perfect gift
for any writer! Also available in large print, Here’s what folks said about one
of the included books, Plotting And Planning: Sue has written a concise manual that
is valuable for both beginning and seasoned writers. Going to write a book? Read
this first! –Bestselling suspense author Kylie Brant Suz deMello’s Plotting And
Planning is a concise, informative, and entertaining look at writing a novel. –Paranormal
author Silver James Regarding the other book that’s in About Writing: Not only did
Write This Not That! reach #2 on Amazon’s writing reference list, but it also garnered
many five star reviews: Five stars…good advice and fun to read. –Jo Frye Five
stars… Kudos to the author for a well-written manual! –Book CraZ Five stars from
me… This short guide covers the essentials and is useful for both new and experienced
writers. –Author Catherine Cavendish

Buy This Book

Amazon http://tinyurl.com/deMelloAboutWriting
(print book only at this time)

Author Social Media

Goodreads –Goodreads: http://bit.ly/SuzATGoodreads
Jane Wenham-Jones is a novelist, journalist and presenter and the author of the Wannabe Books – two how-to manuals on getting published and becoming well-known. Below is an extract from Wannabe a Writer? available on Amazon or through all good bookshops. For more on Jane see http://www.janewenham-jones.com
Research — Do You or Don’t You?
Frederick Forsyth carries out what he calls “relentless research,” spending an entire year at it. Minette Walters is also extremely thorough and painstaking — consulting forensic scientists and attending post-mortems as well as the usual background reading.
While I’m writing this, Jilly Cooper is working on a new racing book. “I have about a hundred books to read,” she told me. “Biographies of jockeys and autobiographies of trainers and biographies of horses…”
I, on the other hand, err on the idle side when it comes to research and tend to proceed on a need-to-know basis rather than mugging up for months in advance.
Lynne Barrett-Lees works in similar way. “It’s all too easy to spend precious writing time jotting down facts, facts, facts, and to put off the hard bit,” she says. Research for her “happens organically as a by-product of writing, definitely not the other way around.” She says: “I don’t allow myself to sweat the small stuff until I reach a point where I need to. As long as I’ve established there’s a patient soul or two who’ll fill me in on any detail I need, I simply call them, as and when, while I’m writing.”
All of which shows that there is no right or wrong answer to how much research you should do as long as, whether it takes six months holed up in the British Library or six minutes on the phone to a friend, you do enough.
Even if you are writing “what you know” you’re still bound to have to check something, and check it you must for as we’ve said already, your novel will only work if it rings true and you won’t achieve that if your facts are wonky.
It is also worth remembering that what we know can only ever be just that — what WE know. By talking to others we can gain different insights or whole new angles on what we thought was familiar territory. Hilary Lloyd, the author of A Necessary Killing (UKA Press), is an ex-farmer who drew on her own experiences of living through the foot and mouth crisis for her novel.
Despite her first-hand knowledge, there were still things she needed to investigate. She says: “My experience of the epidemic was traumatic but a novel demands much more than reminiscences and feelings. I needed facts, and details of procedures employed by government and other official departments. I also needed to confirm that my own trauma wasn’t unique so I read through dozens of bewildered, distraught or angry messages on internet forums used by rural people at the time, and downloaded enough articles and comment from newspapers to wallpaper the whole of the house! The reading and absorbing of this material gave me a much wider view and helped flesh the bones of my plot.”
I did a similar thing when I was writing my second novel, Perfect Alibis, by talking to lots of different women who’d had affairs — or as many I could find who would admit to it!
Interestingly, for the same book I asked several friends who’d had appendicitis what it felt like, and was surprised by just how different their accounts were, and how entirely varied their symptoms.
It was a lesson on the importance of getting more than one version of anything one’s not been through oneself. Make sure you’ve got the majority experience down rather than a one-off.
For if you are asking a reader to suspend their disbelief and get totally absorbed in the world you’ve created, then you owe it to them to make sure that world is as authentic as possible.
I usually do this in one of two simple ways — go on Google or ask someone who might know.
Google is a wonderful tool. There isn’t much you can’t find out on the internet these days though a word of warning: do always check more than one source.
I have just spent a sobering half hour trying to find out how many grams of carbohydrate are in a large glass of wine (hoping to shed ten pounds on a crash Atkins-type diet while still getting pissed every night). The answers have been variously 3g, 1.8g, 5g, and almost 7g (with the only consensus the dispiriting news that to lose weight you have to give up the booze).
Asking an expert on the given subject is usually a safe bet — although again, two is better than one. During the writing of my last book, I checked facts with a GP, a gynecologist, a dog-owner, two wine-writers (who contradicted each other), an ex-policeman, a nurse, and a solicitor.
I also pored over the London A-Z, studied different models of answer-machines, and, since the novel is entitled One Glass Is Never Enough — suffered several near-terminal hangovers.
And I still missed something. I never want my husband to read anything until after it’s published but this time I wished he had. He instantly spotted an irregularity that I had totally overlooked (a bottle of champagne to the first reader to write and tell me what it is. Clue: it will help to be a gardener) and which I’ve been kicking myself for ever since.
I always think that if you have a scene that is heavily dependent on some specialist knowledge — let’s say a scene in the operating theatre in a hospital — then it is a good idea to let someone with first-hand experience — say a surgeon or a nurse – to have a quick read through and check for any dodgy bits.
Even if you have that sort of experience yourself make sure your knowledge is up-to-date. Police procedures, for example, have changed a lot over the years, as have the job-descriptions of teachers. Find someone who is doing the job right now rather than speaking to the old duffer next door who retired in 1976.
If you are lucky enough to get a publishing deal the copy editor will pick up things that need checking, too, but be professional and make sure everything in your manuscript is as accurate as you can make it before you submit it. There’s an old adage about keeping going through a first draft, that says: “Don’t get it right, get it written.” It’s excellent advice. As long as once you have got it written, you make sure you’ve also got it right.
Buy links:
Amazon UK (paperback)
Amazon UK (Kindle)
Amazon US (paperback)
Amazon US (Kindle)
The Book Depository
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