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Tag Archives: Historical Romance

Cover Love at Romance Lives Forever is a short intro to a
book and includes a cover, blurb, buy links, and social media contacts for the
author. Today’s featured book is The Bruised Thistle, an historical romance by Ashley
York.
Iseabail MacNaughton, the orphaned daughter of a Scottish laird,
is forced to flee her home and seek assistance against her lecherous uncle, who
has usurped her family’s land. When she meets Seumas, a strong and valiant mercenary,
she cannot help wondering if he could be the one to stand with her against her uncle.
But with a price on her head and enemies on all sides, her trust is not something
she can afford to give lightly…
Seumas MacDonell is a man wounded in body and soul, driven by
guilt. When he rescues Iseabail from one of his men, he cannot deny the attraction
he feels for her, despite the wound that left him unable to act on it. In the hope
of finding redemption for his sins, he agrees to help Iseabail…but will his feelings
for her prove to be the ultimate obstacle to his salvation?

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Author Social Media

Awfully Glad 
This character interview is with Sam Hines from the gay romance historical book Awfully Glad by Charlie Cochrane.
Genre Historical m/m romance
Book heat level (based on movie ratings): PG13
Publisher Bold Strokes Books
WWI hero Sam Hines is used to wearing
a face that isn’t his own. When he’s not in the trenches he’s the most popular female
impersonator on the front, but a mysterious note from an anonymous admirer leaves
him worried. Everyone realises—eventually—that Sam’s not a woman, but has somebody
also worked out that he also prefers his lovers to be male?
When Sam meets—and falls for—fellow officer Johnny Browne after
the war, he wonders whether he could be the man who wrote the note. If so, is he
the answer to Sam’s dreams or just another predatory blackmailer, ready to profit
from a love which dare not speak its name?

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Interview with Samuel Hines

What is it that you want,
but cannot have? Authors call this the conflict of the story.
I want what any gay man of my era would want – to be able to
live my life without continually looking over my shoulder wondering if I’ll be caught
and disgraced. The lowliest chimney sweep can walk down the road with his girl on
his arm. Is it too much to be allowed to walk down the road with my man on mine?
What’s your internal limitation?
Meaning, what is it about you that makes it so you cannot do what it is you need
to do during this story?
I could say it’s the damn unfairness of the law, making men such
as myself prey to blackmailers, but that’s a coward’s defence. If I’m being honest
in my answer, I can’t help usually assuming the worst, and putting a pessimistic
interpretation on things.
Tell us about your significant
other, that person who makes living worthwhile.
That would have to be Jonny Browne, who I first met when I was
dressed up to the nines as a soubrette. I’d better explain. I was in a WWI concert
party, helping to keep up the lads’ morale. Miss Madeleine was my stage name and
I was trussed up in more feathers, silk and lace than a high class tart. Jonny had
the sort of smile to get my bloomers in a tangle.
What would that person
say about you?
That I’m an infuriating idiot who wouldn’t know a good thing
if it smacked him one in the gob. He’d also (I hope) say I’m handsome, witty and
have a stunning pair of legs. And that my skills in bed were worth the wait.
What special skills do
you rely on?
In bed or out? As I’m a gentleman I’ll refrain from commenting
on the former! I discovered a lot about myself during the war, not least that I
could sing and dance well enough to deceive plenty of people into thinking (at least
for a while) that they were watching a girl. I also found unexpected depths of courage.
They tell me I fought like a lion, but all I can remember was being bloody scared
and having to do my duty despite it.
Are you happy with the
way your story ended? Why or why not?
Of course I am. Happy ever after might be a pipe dream for a
man like me in the era I live in, but Happy for now is more than many of us could
have expected during the war.

About You: Questions for the writer.

You have the length of
a tweet (140 characters) to describe yourself as a writer. Let’s see what you can
do.
If you want nice young men, quirky humour, unusual settings and
ideas, I’m your girl! I can’t deny having written about gay weresloths…
Why did you choose to
write about this character?
I read a fascinating book about the songs of WWI, and was amazed
to discover how popular concert parties had been back then, out in France.
When I found out that some of them contained extremely convincing female impersonators
(at least one of whom got kidnapped by another regiment who wanted ‘her’ for their
own) I had to write a story set against that background.
Was there anything you
discovered about this character that was a surprise to you?
My characters continually surprise me. To the extent that I often
end up re-writing whole sections of stories to make them accord with what I’ve found
out. That may sound like hard work, but I think it gives the storyline authenticity,
rather than shoe-horning a character into a pre-arranged plot. Not that I ever have
a pre-arranged plot.
As for Samuel, I knew he was a courageous fighter, so the extent
of his doubts and fears in peacetime surprised me.
When you wrote about this
character, what made you the most happy? What made you the most sad?
The era itself makes me very sad. Such a waste of life in that
conflict. So many young men cut down in their prime, including heroes of mine like
Wilfred Owen and Ronnie Poulton-Palmer. But I have to keep coming back to it and
exploring the notion of men at war. Awfully Glad is my fourth story set in or around
WWI.
Are any sequels planned
for this book?
I don’t think so. I have a long running series – the Cambridge
Fellows mysteries – and if I have a contemporary cosy mystery with gay romantic
elements which has been submitted to a publisher and that might become a series.
Possibly. One day. If I can leave WWI alone!

Author Social Media

Abigail’s Earl 
Today’s featured book is Abigail’s Earl by Starla Kaye.
She is weary of being the “perfect lady.” He insists
upon it.
Lady Abigail Remington is tired of being the “perfect lady”
and longs to test her adventurous side. She doesn’t want to be tied down in marriage
to a demanding man. James Ranborne, the Earl of Saliston, is brash, bold, and uncommonly
handsome. She wants nothing to do with him…yet he offers her all that she needs:
a husband her family insists upon, freedom to do as she wishes, and no need to waste
time loving him.
A widower, James has no time or desire for love and romance,
but his position as an important noble demands he marry again. He must have a proper
lady beside him at society events and he needs an heir. Abigail appears to fit his
requirements as being acceptable to the ton and she is beyond pretty. She doesn’t
want marriage, thinking she could live happily as a spinster, something her father
would never allow. His proposal of a marriage of convenience, with minor commitments
on her side, should be more than suitable for both their needs.

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Author Social Media

Amanda in the Summer 
Brenda Whiteside, welcome to Romance Lives Forever. Let’s talk
about your book, Amanda in the Summer.
Genre: Mainstream Women’s Fiction, Historical
Buy links:
The Wild Rose Press: http://tinyurl.com/ltatmmf
Worldwide Release date: December 18, 2013
Publisher: The Wild Rose Press
Cover artist: Rae Monet
Length: 45,000 words
Heat rating: sweet
Tagline: Three generations of women…and the secret that strengthens
their love.
Blurb:
A line of women, all named Amanda, stretches back for generations.
Each with her hopes, her joys, her pain—each pouring out her heart in correspondence
with a dear family friend who shares their lives, understands their loves, and joins
in their sorrows.
But within the correspondence lies a secret. And as the youngest
of the Amandas retraces the journey through the years—beginning in post-war America
and following through to modern day—the letters reveal, layer by layer, the Amandas
who came before her. Soon, the truths and lies hidden in the letters lead her down
a path of self-discovery that forges a bond between her past and future.
What are your main characters’ names, ages, and occupations?
Amanda is twenty-four in the opening letter written in 1947.The
letter is written to Tilly who is the same age. Subsequent letters are written by
Amanda’s daughter and granddaughter. All of the Amandas are main characters and
they all write letters to Tilly from 1947 until 2004.

Interview

How did you get your start in the industry?
My first book was published by The Wild Rose Press in 2010. Prior
to that, I had short stories published with some free press both in print and on-line.
What is the most important thing you do for your career now,
as compared to when you first started writing?
I write every day. There are days I get hours of writing in but
there are just as many I get twenty minutes for my craft. The most important thing
is to keep the creative juices flowing.
What websites do you visit daily?
That varies, but I’m on Facebook every day. There are several
blogs I check in on if the subject matter attracts me.
If you could change something about your first book, what
would it be?
I’d give it one more good edit to catch the things we missed.
And I might deepen the POV. All in all, it was meant to be a lighthearted suspense
for entertainment, and I still see it that way.
What do you enjoy most about writing?
When words come together I find amusing, or when a character
pops off the page I get excited. So often, creativity is spontaneous. I’m not the
only writer that says this. We all have those moments when characters run away with
the story, and we’re just a conduit to the page. It’s plain old fun!
If you could choose anyone to be your mentor who would it
be?
I’d have to have two – Maeve Binchy and Diana Gabaldon. I love
the ever day people feel to Binchy’s stories. I also think she’s a terrific storyteller.
Gabaldon is a master at deep POV. You can live through her characters. I’d like
to excel to their level in both those talents.
If you could give the younger version of yourself advice what
would it be?
My younger version didn’t know I wanted to be an author. I’d
have to tell myself my happiness would be greatest writing – and to get busy and
stop wasting time.
What is your work ethic when it comes to writing?
Like I said, I write every day, but I still get distracted by
life. You know? So I do have that daily work ethic to keep at it although I wish
I could ramp it up more.
How do you cope with stress as an author?
I work harder. And I complain and eat chocolate.
Do things your family or friends do ever end up in a book?
Often.
What are some jobs you’ve done before (or while) you were
a writer?
I managed a swimming pool company years ago. I’ve worked in a
library, flipped hamburgers at a goofy-golf course and trained child care providers
in nutrition.
Which of your books would you recommend to someone who doesn’t
normally read your genre, and why?
I’d recommend The Morning After because it’s short (so they wouldn’t
feel like they were getting roped in for a long read they might not like), sexy
(but not too sexy) and fun (if they get entertained they might come back for more).
What kind of books do you read when taking a break from your
own writing?
I’m on a suspense kick right now, probably because I’m writing
a romantic suspense.
What do you think is the future of traditional publishing?
There will always be a place for it, but not the monopoly of
the past.
What do you wish I had asked you? Please ask and answer it
now.
Do you have another book in the works for publication? As a matter
of fact, I do! The Art of Love and Murder is currently in the editing process at
The Wild Rose Press so the release date hasn’t been set. This is a romantic suspense
I had a great time writing. I’ve got at least two more novels spinning off from
characters in this book.
Imagine you get to go on a dream vacation, but you have only
one hour to pack and leave, and it starts as soon as you finish this interview.
What will you take with you and where will you go?
My cosmetics would be first, followed by a few sweaters, boots
and denim. Love my denim. Then I’d be off to Ireland. One of my grandfathers, a very
colorful man, was Irish and I’ve always wanted to go there.
What is your favorite holiday and why?
Thanksgiving has always been my favorite. The coming together
of family and friends for nothing more than to eat and talk is so enjoyable. No
stress of giving and getting in the material sense. It’s the one time each year
when I’ll get to enjoy people I might not see all year long.
What good book have you read recently?
I’m reading Sandford’s Prey series about Lucas Davenport. I’m
on book four.
Brenda Whiteside

Previous Books

Sleeping with the Lights On
Honey On White Bread
The Morning After
Warm Christmas Wishes (Anthology)
A Holiday to Remember (written
with nine other authors)
Just One Wish (Holiday anthology)

Books Coming Soon

The Art of Love and Murder

Find Me Here

Group Blog, The Roses of Prose: http://rosesofprose.blogspot.com/

Legend of the Mist 
Veronica Bale, welcome to Romance Lives Forever. Let’s talk about
your book, Legend of the Mist.
Genre: Historical romance
Publisher: Self
Cover artist: Viola Estrella Cover Art
Length: 224 pages
Heat rating: 18+
Tagline: An island rises from mist; a destiny rises from legend
Blurb:
There is a legend familiar to those who call the island of Fara their home. It is one that is passed
down through the generations. From mothers who whisper the tale to their bairns
as they float into dreams each night. From starry-eyed lasses who pray to find for
themselves the undying love of which it speaks. From elders who know the magic of
the thick and inexplicable mist surrounding this, and no other, of Orkney’s islands
which rise from the sea off Scotland’s northern coast.
As the daughter of Clan Gallach’s chief, Norah knows the legend
better than anyone on the island. It tells of a lady who waits in the mists of Fara
for her long lost love to return to her. It’s an entertaining story, to be sure.
But it is no more than fantasy. Or so the islanders say. But Norah is not so certain.
All her life she’s felt that the legend is more than simple folklore, that the lady
of the mist is more real than anyone wishes to believe.
But these are turbulent times, marked by the very real tales
of Norse invaders and their brutality. When her people are conquered by a band of
fearsome Vikings, one among them will blur the lines between reality and legend
like never before. For Norah cannot help but feel that she knows him … from some
other time … from some other life …
Buy links:
What are your main characters’ names, ages, and occupations?
Legend of the Mist is the story of Norah, daughter of the chief
of Clan Gallach, and Torsten, a Viking raider whose men conquer the clan’s island,
Fara, off the northern coast of Scotland.
Among the people of Clan Gallach exists a legend which tells of a Lady of the Mist.
It is said that the lady, who when her warrior love was killed in battle cast herself
into the sea, waits in the mists of Fara for a time when her love will return to
her. Norah had always thought the legend was just a story, but when Torsten appears
on the island, she begins to wonder whether the legend may, in fact, be true. Is
she the Lady of the Mist, and is Torsten her warrior love? As for their ages, I
wrote Norah at 19 years, but did not really identify Torsten’s age. When writing
him, I pictured him to be between 25 and 30.

Interview

How did you get your start in the industry?
I started as a freelance writer, ghostwriting short stories and
novellas for a number of different clients. At some point I decided to write the
story that I wanted to tell, and released my first novel, Bride of Dunloch (book
1 of my Highland Loyalties trilogy), in August, 2012.
What is the most important thing you do for your career now,
as compared to when you first started writing?
Social media. Since releasing Bride of Dunloch I’ve discovered
how much self-marketing authors, especially indie authors, need to do. I’m slowly
improving my presence on the web; I’m leaps and bounds ahead of where I started,
at least.
What websites do you visit daily?
I’m on twitter every day, of course. That’s actually my go-to
spot for a lot of industry information (romance news, writing tips, publishing help,
etc.). Not knowing much about it when I joined, I was surprised to see how useful
a resource twitter is. So many great people are sharing so much great stuff, it’s
an amazing community.
If you could change something about your first book, what
would it be?
There are a ton of things I would change … but I’ll never say
what they are (insert devious laugh here).
What do you enjoy most about writing?
I like meeting my characters. That probably sounds strange, but
for me, my characters already exist. I didn’t make them up, they came into being
on their own, and the only difference between them and me is that I live in the
real world, whereas they live in my head. It’s exciting, I never know which character
I’m going to meet next.
If you could choose anyone to be your mentor who would it
be?
I wish I could give you one great name, like Salman Rushdie or
Margaret Atwood, but really I would love to have as a mentor someone who works in
the publishing industry. Just someone with a wealth of knowledge about good writing,
good publishing, good marketing, all that. Those individuals are just as important
as the actual authors; I’d love the opportunity to learn from those who make a career
out of helping authors be successful.
If you could give the younger version of yourself advice what
would it be?
I would say, “Hey, Veronica, get started on that first book.
Don’t wait like I did.”
What is your work ethic when it comes to writing?
I’m not sure I have a work ethic, because I don’t consider writing
work. I write because I love to write, I love to create stories and discover the
lives of my characters. For me, writing is like reading. I no more have a writing
ethic than a reading ethic. I read and write wherever and whenever I can.
How do you cope with stress as an author?
Again, I wouldn’t so much call it stress as excitement. This
is a fast-paced world, this indie-author place, and as frightening and labour-intensive
as it can be, it’s also incredibly rewarding.
Do things your family or friends do ever end up in a book?
For the purpose of this interview I’m going to say no. My friends
and family might be reading this, and I wouldn’t want to let the cat out of the
bag … if there was a cat to let out of the bag, that is (insert another devious
laugh here).
What are some jobs you’ve done before (or while) you were
a writer?
Believe it or not, I actually have a background in finance and
accounting. Nothing like staring at numbers all day to get your creative juices
flowing.
Which of your books would you recommend to someone who doesn’t
normally read your genre, and why?
I would recommend any one of them. There is sometimes a stigma
associated with romance novels, I think. Those who don’t read them are more likely
to dismiss them because of the provocative covers, or because of what romance novels
were thirty and forty years ago. But today’s romance novels have evolved. They’re
sources of historical information; the writing is often superb; character and plot
development are top-notch. These are all things I’ve paid attention to and worked
hard on. I think a non-romance reader would be surprised to discover how enjoyable
and worth-while romance novels can be.
What kind of books do you read when taking a break from your
own writing?
Reading
is an integral part of my writing, so I never “take a break” to read.
I make time for both. My tastes are eclectic. Every book provides me with the opportunity
to learn, and I read a wide range. I will finish up a Jayne Ann Krentz one day,
and take up a Charles Dickens classic the next. I am as eager to read futuristic
fantasy as historical non-fiction. It’s all fascinating.
What do you think is the future of traditional publishing?
Bride of Dunloch 
It’s not going anywhere; It will always have its place. The difference
today is that the paradigm of twenty years ago is gone – advances, multi-million
dollar deals, dedicated marketing and promotion, etc. But that doesn’t mean traditional
publishing has gone with it. It will always be there, and it will always be something
authors (I use the term non-exhaustively) strive for, whether going the indie author
route first or not. We’re starting to see a shift now where indie authors are proving
to agents and publishers that they can be successful, and that is persuading publishers
to take them on. The difference today is that, even if traditional publishers decline
to publish, that author still has a place to make his or her voice heard and books
available to the public.
What do you wish I had asked you? Please ask and answer it
now.
What kind of reader response have you seen so far?
I am amazed by how many people have connected with me to let
me know what they thought about my books. Each time a reader contacts me, leaves
me a message on my facebook page, tweets something about me, etc., I’m not only
flattered, I’m honoured. I’m reminded of why I write in the first place – because
I want to share something, and I want to inspire, entertain, and reach people with
something I think they’ll enjoy. It’s such a great thing to see that I’m accomplishing
that goal.
What was the proudest moment of your life so far?
Besides the day my son was born? I’d say getting that first positive
response from a reader. Just knowing that I’d reached someone, that I’d made an
impression on them, that was a great moment.
Imagine you get to go on a dream vacation, but you have only
one hour to pack and leave, and it starts as soon as you finish this interview.
What will you take with you and where will you go?
Laptop, thermals and sturdy footwear. Why? I’d be going to Scotland,
of course! I can buy the flagon of whiskey when I get there.
What good book have you read recently?
I’ve read a lot of good books, but lately I have become a fan
of Kate Morton. I love her style, and the way she describes things. She creates
an atmosphere with her novels, a very haunting one. I admire that.
Where were you at midnight, on December 31st when the new
century started?
I was in Northern Ontario at
a friend’s cottage, panicking over whether or not anything would happen to my family
back in the city. At 12:15 am when the television stations were still airing I figured
nothing catastrophic had happened and went to bed.
What do you like to do when you’re bored?
Daydream. Isn’t that what all writers do? Of course that sometimes
gets me into hot water, like if I’m bored and start daydreaming when I should be
paying attention to something … that happens a lot, unfortunately.
If your life became a movie, who would you want to play you?
Honestly? I think I’d like to be surprised. I would love to see
what someone does with that role. I wouldn’t want to have any pre-conceived notions
about who would be best to play me and exclude all others. That assumes my life
is interesting enough to make a movie out of … which it’s not, and that’s why I
write in the first place.
If you were a color, what color would you be?
Chameleon-coloured. I’m so indecisive, I’d never be happy with
just one colour.
What do you wish I had asked you? Please ask and answer it
now.
What is the next book you plan to write?
I’ve got a basic storyline in mind, but no title yet. In a historical
context, I’m moving a little ahead of where Highland Loyalties and Legend of the
Mist were, to the mid-15th century. I’ve become rather intrigued by the
story of the Black Douglasses and their feud with King James II of Scotland.
I’d like to try and write a story that is more defined by actual recorded history,
and plan to craft one around the Douglas clan.
Please underline which statement is more like you:
“I am a vacation spa because I am laid back and relaxed.”
“I am a ten-countries in ten-days tour vacation, because
I do things as fast as possible.”

Please complete the sentences

I love pizza with milk.
I’m always ready for Coronation Street.
When I’m alone, I talk to myself. A lot!
You’d never be able to tell, but I write romance novels. I
tend to keep that quiet in my day-to-day life, just because I’m not big on talking
about myself, much less bragging about my accomplishments. When I do tell people
I’m an author, I get “I never would have guessed that,” or “it’s
always the quiet ones.”
If I had a halo it would be quickly
taken away, because I’m no angel, just a flawed human being trying my best to be
a good person.
If I could live anywhere in the world I’d live in a
small, stone cottage in the Highlands of Scotland. Is that predictable? Yeah,
probably …
I can never go skydiving with my husband like he wants me
to
because I am a complete scaredy-cat when it comes to things like that.
I like it when my head is in the clouds, not my whole body.

Previous Books

Bride of Dunloch (Highland Loyalties volume 1)
Uniting the Clans (Highland Loyalties volume 2)
The Laird Returns (Highland Loyalties volume 3)

Books Coming Soon

Soon? None. Eventually? Yep … not sure of the details, but I’ll
get there.

Contest

As a special occasion to mark this interview with Romance Lives
Forever, tweet this: 
Win Legend of the
Mist by @VeronicaBale1 #RLFblog http://is.gd/legendcontest 

for a chance to be entered to win one of two free Kindle
copies of Legend of the Mist. I will contact the winners via twitter, and will also
tweet the results of the contest. The close date for this contest will be November
26th, 2013.

Find Me Here

Emma’s Wish 
Cover Love at Romance Lives Forever is a short intro to a
book and includes a cover, blurb, buy links, and social media contacts for the
author. Today’s featured book is Emma’s Wish by Margery Scott.
Still grieving his wife’s death, Sam Jenkins needs a mother for
his children. He can’t build his ranch and care for three precocious youngsters
alone. Emma Witherspoon has accepted the fact that she will never have a husband
and children of her own, but that doesn’t ease the ache in her heart. When Emma
makes Sam an offer he can’t refuse, neither of them can foresee the changes in their
lives because of two little words – “I do.”

Buy Links:

Find Me Here

 
 
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