Megan Jane Colville shares Aussie Animals #Koala @meganjanewrites #RLFblog #Romance #Anthology Megan Jane Colville, welcome to Romance Lives Forever. I’m Kayelle Allen, author and owner of this blog. Happy to have you here! Please share your insight about animals in Australia.

Native Animals That Won’t Kill You Down Under

Megan Jane Colville
Australia has a vast variety of native animals, and yes, it’s true we have many that can kill you, but encounters with them aren’t common. Don’t be put off by the venomous and scary variety; Australia has some of the most unique and gorgeous native wildlife that won’t kill you. Here are eight of my favourites:
Koala
Koalas are the quintessential Australian symbol. Contrary to many people’s belief koalas are not bears but marsupials. They eat eucalyptus leaves exclusively and like to spend their time living in these trees. With their big fluffy ears and their 18-22 hour a day sleeping habit, they are the ultimate in cuddly. Don’t let their fur fool you though; their claws are definitely not to be messed with and they should never be approached in the wild. That being said, koalas aren’t the easiest to spot in the wild and are often only noticeable as grey bumps against the pale bark of their gum tree homes.
Kangaroos and wallabies
Kangaroos and wallabies give koalas a run for their money as the most recognisable native Australian animal. Also marsupials, they fall into the macropod family. Kangaroos are identifiable by their large size, long tails and red or grey colour, whereas, wallabies are smaller in size and tend to have darker fur.
While kangaroos can be seen lazing in any available shade in the open plains of outback Australia, it’s the wallaby that is more commonly seen closer to towns and often in the backyards of everyday Aussies.
Galah
The galah – our romantics – is a distinctive type of Australian cockatoo (or parrot) identifiable by their rose-pink coloured chest, lighter head, grey wings and markings. Female galahs can be distinguished from their male counterparts by their lighter coloured eyes. Galahs are known to bond for life, raise their young together and only re-partner upon the death of their mate. Galahs congregate in flocks and are a frequent seen throughout Australia. They make an impressive sight foraging in grass and roosting on branches. They aren’t the most intelligent birds, and they make a highly raucous noise, especially when flying overhead.
Echidna and platypus
The echidna and platypus are monotremes, the only two mammals in the world that lay their own eggs rather than giving birth to live young. Unique, they are rarely sighted in the wild and it is a privilege if you see them in their natural habitat. Similar to a hedgehog, the echidna is covered in spines with stout little legs and an elongated snout they use to eat ants. While their spines make them look quite formidable they are shy animals and are known to curl into a tight ball when threatened.
The platypus is a land and water based animal with a streamlined body, a bill like a duck and tail like a beaver. Platypus have unique electro-receptors in their bills they use to detect the muscular contractions of their prey. Female platypus create long burrows to lay their eggs and then curl their body around the eggs to keep them warm until they hatch. For some extraordinary video footage of a platypus in the wild check out this video: https://vimeo.com/106131061
Quokka
Often described as the happiest animal in the world, the quokka is a smaller relative of the kangaroo in the macropod family. Around the size of a domestic cat, the quokka is primarily found on small islands off the coast of western Australia. Quokkas live in dense vegetation, forage for plants and doze during the day. They have little fear of humans and a quick Internet search will show some pretty awesome selfies taken with these happy little creatures.
Wombat
Wombats are marsupials that can grow upwards of 40 inches long with short stubby legs. They have incredible strength and large claws they use to create intricate burrow systems. They are unique to other marsupials by their backward facing pouch, which prevents dirt filling their pouch while burrowing. They are slow moving animals and can occasionally be seen waddling across plains.

Love Sabre

Genre Contemporary Anthology

Book heat level (based on movie ratings): Various, my story – R

Phoenix had a hellish childhood. As a teenager, she was placed in a foster home that seemed like heaven, until the worst thing that could happen – did. Her biggest regret when she fled in the night, leaving behind the only man she’d ever loved, her Liam.

Where to buy Love Sabre

Publisher Boroughs Publishing Group http://boroughspublishinggroup.com/books/love-sabre
Amazon https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07987LNPC
Kobo https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/love-sabre
Smashwords https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/783322
Barnes and Noble https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/love-sabre-kristine-charles/1127884057

Megan Jane Colville Social Media

Megan Jane Colville loves stories. And words. And how such simple words can create such wondrous stories. Books have always held the dearest place in Megan’s heart, and her earliest memories are those from myth, legend and fairytale. However, above all, Megan loves love and has the privilege of witnessing the miracle of love firsthand as a midwife.
After many years working in hospitals Megan allowed her passion for the written word and her dream of combining her two loves to guide her to complete a Master of Arts degree in writing, editing and publishing with an emphasis on romance fiction. Since completing her degree, she has been dividing her days (and nights) between delivering babies and crafting stories.
Personal website https://www.meganjanecolville.com
Love Sabre website https://www.lovesabre.com
Twitter https://www.twitter.com/meganjanewrites
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/meganjanecolville
Instagram https://www.instagram.com/meganjanecolville

Image credits Echidna – Jacob Dyer (Unsplash.com), Quokka – Natilie Su (Unsplash.com)